Yoo Ah In’s Studio Concrete releases 1TO10 Series ver.2 “Masterpiece”, available in CCRT online store

Yoo Ah In is wearing 1TO10 Ver.2 MASTERPIECE in “Chicago Typewriter” (cr: ND)

 

Yoo Ah In’s Studio Concrete is looking to repeat the commercial success of its critically acclaimed “How Do You Feel 1 to 10?” series. Two years after the launching of 1TO10 series version 1, Studio Concrete released the Series 1TO10 Version 2 “MASTERPIECE” on June 1st, 2017.

The Series 1TO10 Ver.2 MASTERPIECE “How do you feel 1 to 10?” conveys the metaphor of emotions expressed by the characters in the world’s renown classic paintings and number 1 to 10 as indicators of the individual’s emotional state. Each number printed on the tee represents and expresses the mood of a particular person today. For instance, Today Level: ‘Low 1’, ‘Very Good 10’, ‘Love 9’, ‘Empty 2’ -everything about joy, sadness, and more.

On its instagram, Studio Concrete wishes that the consumers will enjoy all the steps of thinking, choosing, wearing, and understanding the product. Yoo Ah In also posted a promo video of this new collection in his instagram on June 2nd~

#series1to10 ver.2 @StudioConcrete 1️⃣2️⃣3️⃣4️⃣5️⃣6️⃣7️⃣8️⃣9️⃣🔟

A post shared by 유아인/Ah-in Yoo (@hongsick) on

 

1TO10 Version 2 “Masterpiece” Campaign

1.LOW
Naked Woman Kneeling in Front of A Red Couch (1915) – Felix Vallotton

Felix Vallotton was a Swiss/French painter and printmaker associated with Les Nabis [a group of Post-Impressionist avant-garde artists who set the pace for fine arts and graphic arts in France in the 1890s. Initially a group of friends interested in contemporary art and literature, most of them studied at the private art school of Rodolphe Julian (Académie Julian) in Paris in the late 1880s]. He was an important figure in the development of the modern woodcut [woodcut is relief printing technique in printmaking]. His woodcut subjects included domestic scenes, bathing women, portrait heads, and several images of street crowds and demonstrations. Vallotton’s figures have a life beyond the paint that depicts them; they both offer and withhold a narrative. And then, inevitably, there are the nudes. But Vallotton was always walking along his own path, and it led to an increasing concentration on monumental images of the female nude. Read more here

 

 

2.EMPTY
Woman Seen From the Back (1888) – Vilhelm Hammershoi

Vilhelm Hammershoi was a Danish painter. He is known for his poetic, subdued portraits and interiors. In Hammershoi’s interiors, most people, like this woman in “Woman Seen from the Back” (1888), are turned away or preoccupied. His works reflect his focus on solitude, silence and a universe reduced to shades of gray. His paintings are best described as muted in tone. He refrained from employing bright colors, opting always for a limited palette consisting of greys, as well as desaturated yellows, greens, and other dark hues. His tableaux of figures turned away from the viewer project an air of slight tension and mystery, while his exteriors of grand buildings are devoid of people, a quality they share with his landscapes. Read more here.

 

 

3.BLUE
The Young Apprentice (1918) – Amedeo Modigliani 

Amedeo Clemente Modigliani was an Italian Jewish painter and sculptor who worked mainly in France. He is known for portraits and nudes in a modern style characterized by elongation of faces and figures, that were not received well during his lifetime, but later found acceptance. “The Young Apprentice” (1918) reproduces the pose of certain drinkers and smokers by Paul Cézanne. Modigliani focuses here on the relationships between the figure and its environment. The young man is seated, pensive, his head resting on one hand. The chair and table appear to merge with his body and relieve its heaviness. Read more here.

 

 

4.LAZY
Bathers at Asnières (1884) – Georges Seurat

Georges Seurat was a French post-Impressionist painter and draftsman. He is noted for his innovative use of drawing media and for devising the painting techniques known as chromoluminarism and pointillism. “Bathers at Asnières” (French: Une Baignade, Asnières) is the first of his two masterpieces on the monumental scale. Seurat completed the painting of “Bathers at Asnières” in 1884, when he was 24 years old. He applied to the jury of the Salon of the same year to have the work exhibited there, but the jury rejected it. “Bathers at Asnieres” gave a rare glimpse into the lives of the working class and contains a subtle criticism of classism. The Bathers continued to puzzle many of Seurat’s contemporaries, and the picture was not widely acclaimed until many years after the death of the artist at the age of just 31. Read 15 Revealing Things About Seurat’s “Bathers at Asnières” here

 

5.BALANCE
Narcissus (1594-96) – Caravaggio 

Narcissus is a painting by the Italian Baroque master Caravaggio, painted circa 1597–1599. It is housed in the Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Antica in Rome. This is one of only two known Caravaggios on a theme from Classical mythology, although this reflects the accidents of survival rather than the historical reality. The story of Narcissus, told by the poet Ovid in his Metamorphoses, is of a handsome youth who falls in love with his own reflection. Unable to tear himself away, he dies of his passion, and even when crossing the Styx, keeps looking at his own reflection. Caravaggio painted an adolescent page wearing an elegant brocade doublet, leaning with both hands over the water, as he gazes at this own distorted reflection. The painting conveys an air of brooding melancholy: the figure of Narcissus is locked in a circle with his reflection, surrounded by darkness, so that the only reality is inside this self-regarding loop.

 

 

6.HOPE
Boy Blowing Soap Bubbles (1867) – Edouard Manet

This could be the most wanted tee among fans since Yoo Ah In wore this shirt in “Chicago Typewriter” episode 5. Many believe that this is Yoo Ah In’s character Han Se Joo’s statement as well. Read more about the meaning of “Boy Blowing Soap Bubbles” in our earlier post here.

 

 

7.DANCE
The Dance of Life (1899) – Edvard Munch

A recognized forerunner of Expressionism, Norwegian painter and printmaker Edvard Munch is renowned for his representations of emotion. Associated with the international development of Symbolism, “The Dance of Life”, which Munch pained in 1900, takes place on a bright summer night along the shore of Aasgaardstrand in Oslo Fjord. “The Dance of Life” belongs to a series called the “Frieze of Life”, which can be interpreted from various viewpoints and on various levels. This frieze was intended as a series of freely adjoining pictures, which would give a clear view of life and the situation of modern man. Read more here and here.

 

 

8.SUPER
Venus and Cupid (1625) – Roeloff van Zijl

Roeloff van Zijl was a Dutch painter of the Golden Age. He is considered a Caravaggist and specialized in genre history and landscapes. In classical mythology, Cupid (Latin Cupīdō, meaning “desire”) is the god of desire, erotic love, attraction and affection. He is often portrayed as the son of the love goddess Venus and the war god Mars. Venus and Cupid are often shown in intimate poses, reflecting the unique love between mother and child.

 

 

9.LOVE
The Kiss (1898) – Felix Vallotton

“The Kiss” is the second work of Vallotton picked by Studio Concrete for the 1TO10 “Masterpiece” collection. The painting depicts another intimate scene that placing us as a voyeur.

 

10.HIGH
Self-portrait Laughing (1907) – Richard Gerstl

Richard Gerstl was an Austrian painter and draughtsman known for his expressive psychologically insightful portraits, his lack of critical acclaim during his lifetime (his works were never exhibited until he died), and his affair with the wife of famous composer Arnold Schoenberg which led to his suicide. The affair had big impact both on the art of Gerstl and on some of the most revolutionary and influential pieces composed by Schönberg and his contemporaries in the early 20th century. Read more here and here.

 

The Series 1TO10 Ver.2 MASTERPIECE “How do you feel 1 to 10?” is available for sales and worldwide shipping in CCRT online store

Our Sassy Translator just ordered five tees through CCRT Online Store, and she shared her short review on the collection:

[At first,] I didn’t think that I will like this collection, to be honest. I didn’t know if the paintings were truly beautiful to be put on shirt, since I only managed to see mini photos of those shirts in that [promotional] video they released weeks ago. So when I saw the campaign photos [in the online store], I was floored! The paintings they chose -although they were all new to me- were all beautiful and touched my heart. They made excellent choices. The design of the numbers, that the tag they attach to the edge of the shirt contained the painting title, name of the artist, date, such a wonderful touch. The fact that the size of the paintings were different from one feeling [emotional state] to another, I truly loveddddd it! The shirts are smart, artistic and chic. Bravo!! We liked them so much that we ordered five (6-Hope, 2-Empty, 10-High, 7-Dance, 5-Balance). Can’t wait to receive our order. – Sassy Translator

 

Happy shopping!

 

Source: Studio Concrete

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Comments
3 Responses to “Yoo Ah In’s Studio Concrete releases 1TO10 Series ver.2 “Masterpiece”, available in CCRT online store”
  1. Laura says:

    I like HOPE and BALANCE ❤ Thank you for the background details, Furbabe

  2. Yasuyo says:

    I could learn art in Sikseekland. Thank you!! By the way, several weeks ago I ran into a woman wearing ‘LOW’ of the previous series 1 to 10 in a train. I very nearly talked to the stranger in a familiar tone.^^; She is of course Ain fan, isn’t she? Happy shopping, evryone!

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